Research Storytelling

The Berkeley Food Institute (BFI) announces a 2021-22 funding cycle for media expenses that support collaborative, interdisciplinary research projects, aligned with the mission of the Institute, and led by faculty and/or cooperative extension specialists at UC Berkeley. Research Storytelling grants are meant to help disseminate research that has already been completed. Media grants are up to $5,000, and the funding should be expended within one year of officially receiving the award from BFI.

About us: The Berkeley Food Institute seeks to transform food systems to expand access to healthy, affordable food and promote sustainable and equitable food production. We empower new leaders with capacities to cultivate diverse, just, resilient, and healthy food systems.

Criteria for selection:

  • Creative, cross-cultural, accessible communication plans
  • Clear and executable plan to spend the funds
  • Cost efficiency

Timing and Outcomes

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis starting December 1, 2021. 

All grantees will be expected to submit a final report within a month of the conclusion of the grant term. Grantees may be invited to present their work, whether completed, or in-progress, at a BFI event. 

Allowable expenses include: 

  • Funding to hire a photographer, editor, graphic designer, web designer, or other relevant professional to further storytelling of Berkeley research on food and agriculture systems.
  • Funding to edit and/or distribute an original film or video.
  • Printing or duplication expenses. 
  • Funding to pay for technology platforms that would increase dissemination of Berkeley research on food and agriculture systems.
  • Funding for high-quality storytelling training, ideally shared with other colleagues. 

Apply today for the BFI Research Storytelling Grant Program. Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis.

Seth M. Holmes is a recipient of the Research Storytelling Grant. Recently, Professor Holmes' participatory film First Time Home premiered at the Portland Film Festival. Holmes' film, made jointly with Indigenous binational families, follows four cousins who record their travels from California to visit relatives in their ancestral village in southern Mexico.