Research Database

This database is a curation of over 170 entries from UC Berkeley faculty and staff in a variety of formats: academic journal articles, reports, videos, and mainstream media pieces. We created this database to allow visitors to search for a topic and easily find research results from the UC Berkeley community. This database is a "living" database with new articles added continually.



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Year Published

Examining the public debate on school food nutrition guidelines: Findings and lessons learned from an analysis of news coverage and legislative debates

Authors

Lori Dorfman

Publication Types

Report

Source

Berkeley Media Studies Group

Year Published

2016

tags

federal, Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, legislation, news media analysis, news media framing, opinion, public health, states

Policy Summaryj

This paper examines state and local-level debates about standards that the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) created for the National School Lunch Program in 2010. Dorfman examined regulatory testimony and newsarticles published in 11 states, assessing the content, quantity, people featured, and arguments in favor or against the new federal legislation. Pro-HHFKA articles tend to be straight news stories, not opinion pieces, suggesting that there is an opportunity for public health advocates to use the opinion pages to shape the narrative around legislation.

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Beyond Income: What Else Predicts Very Low Food Security Among Children?

Authors

Patricia Anderson

Kristin Butcher Hilary Hoynes

Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach

Publication Types

Academic Literature

Source

Southern Economic Journal

Year Published

2016

tags

benefits, children, families, food insecurity, food security, food stamps, free and reduced-price lunch, households, mental health, nutrition, physical health, SNAP, teenager

Policy Summaryj

Here, Hoynes et al examines characteristics that are associated with United States households that have children with very low food security who may be at risk of nutritional deficienciesThe authors find that these households commonly have teenage children and participate in programs such as SNAP and free and reduced-price lunch. The presence of an adult in the household who has poor mental or physical health is the most important factor to determine if children will be food insecureThese findings suggest that policy that promotes parental health may have beneficial effects on children’s health and nutritionFurthermore, nutrition programs should consider the age of household members when determining benefits to better meet the needs of recipients.

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Food environment and weight change: does residential mobility matter? The Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE)

Authors

Nancy Adler

SD Blanchard

W Dow

Maggi Kelly Barbara Laraia

Howard Moffet

Dean Schillinger

Margaret E Warton

YT Zhang

Publication Types

Academic Literature

Source

American Journal of Epidemiology

Year Published

2017

tags

BMI, body mass index, built environment, diabetes, food environment, healthy foods, nutrition, obesity, weight loss

Policy Summaryj

Kelly et al examined the effects of living in a healthful food environment on the body mass index of adults with Type II Diabetes. They found that living in a healthy food environment is associated with a 1-pound decrease in body mass index for people who did not move over the course of the study. There was no significant change in body mass index for participants who did move. This paper suggests that for individuals who want to lose weight, living next to good food options is not enough to spur weight loss. Additional programs or diets are needed for meaningful change.  

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Food Prices and the Welfare of Poor Consumers

Authors

Ethan Ligon

Publication Types

Mainstream Media

Source

Giannini Foundation of Agriculture Economics

Year Published

2008

tags

food access, global food system, poverty, SNAP, WIC

Policy Summaryj

Ligon believes that increases in the global price of food will have a larger impact on people living in poverty than people of higher socioeconomic status because people living in poverty devote a greater portion of their income to purchasing food. He argues that if global food prices increase substantially, people will be pushed into poverty and forced to reallocate funding from other areas like housing to avoid starvationHis argument can be extended to promote tying social service benefits to the cost of inflation. As the cost of food and other necessities increases, programs such as WIC and SNAP should increase their benefits accordingly.   

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Ownership characteristics and crop selection in California cropland

Authors

Van Butsic

Luke T. Macaulay

Publication Types

Academic Literature

Source

California Agriculture

Year Published

2017

tags

agriculture, California, California Agriculture, conservation programs, crop land, food production, land ownership, property

Policy Summaryj

Macaulay and Butsic describe the characteristics of crop land ownership in California to provide insight on food production systems, agricultural promotion, conservation practices, and land fragmentation. They find that these outcomes can be determined by land ownership and property size. This information can be used by policymakers or other relevant stakeholders to tailor agricultural outreach efforts and research to fit the community’s needs.

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Stitching the West Back Together: Chapter 1 A Brief History of People and Policy in the West

Authors

Thomas Sheridan

Publication Types

Book

Source

University of Chicago Press Books

Year Published

2014

tags

American West, biodiversity, conservation, forestry, land use policy, private land, public land, ranching, tribal land

Policy Summaryj

This book contends that sustainable working landscapes are critical to the conservation of biodiversity in the American West and the cultures of rural ranching and forestry that depend on them. Chapter 1 provides the historical context for how the West became the patchwork of private, tribal, and public lands that exist today. American land-use policy often promoted contradictions that pitted different interests against each other, however the modern conservation movement is trying to bring different stakeholders to consensus on how the land should be managed.

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Stitching the West Back Together: Chapter 2 Status and Trends of Western Working Landscapes

Authors

Susan Charnley

Thomas Sheridan

Publication Types

Book

Source

University of Chicago Press Books

Year Published

2014

tags

American West, biodiversity, economy, forestry, grazing, ranching, rangelands, timber production, working landscapes

Policy Summaryj

This book contends that sustainable working landscapes are critical to the conservation of biodiversity in the American West and the cultures of rural ranching and forestry that depend on them. Chapter 2 highlights recent trends in western working forests and rangelands, including a discussion of the history of timber production and grazing. How land and resources are used has important implication for the people who make their living off the land. Changes in usage and protection can change the type of jobs and economy supported in those locations.

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Q&A, Professor Nathan Sayre on his new book: The Politics of Scale: A History of Rangeland Science

Authors

Nathan Sayre

Publication Types

Blog

Source

Berkeley Food Institute

Year Published

2017

tags

conservation, livestock, rangeland management, rangelands

Policy Summaryj

Sayre is interviewed on his new book, The Politics of Scale: A History of Rangeland Science. He speaks to commonly held beliefs about rangelands and describes rangeland management practices, including the role of livestock in rangeland, environmental conservation, and the political and economic forces that determine usage of rangeland.  

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Effects of the Great Recession on the U.S. Agricultural Labor Market

Authors

Maoyong Fan

Jeffrey Perloff

Publication Types

Report

Source

Institute for Research on Labor and Employment

Year Published

2015

tags

agriculture, farm worker, labor, labor supply, recession, undocumented immigrants

Policy Summaryj

Perloff et al examines the effect that recessions have on agriculture labor supply and on agriculture output. To do this, they examine the 1990-1991, 2001, and 2008 recessions to see how the pay, probability of receiving a bonus, and hours worked weekly change for documented and undocumented farm workers. They conclude that agriculture yields remain constant during recessions, yet pay for undocumented farm workers often increases. This paper provides insight as to how the agricultural labor force and compensation for labor performed can be expected to change during the next recession.  

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Retail Globalization and Household Welfare: Evidence from Mexico

Authors

David Atkin

Benjamin Faber

Marco Gonzalez-Navarro

Publication Types

Academic Literature

Source

Journal of Political Economy

Year Published

2018

tags

business, consumer price index, cost of living, developing countries, economics, employment, Mexico, retail, workers

Policy Summaryj

Atkin at el examines the effect of the arrival of global retail chains in Mexico on Mexican household’s welfare and on traditional retail stores. Foreign retailers charge lower prices and offer bigger selections than traditional retail stores, which lowers the cost of living for residents. However, the entry of foreign retail stores is associated with a decline in traditional retail’s profit margin and people employed. No significant effect was found on overall household income or level of employment. This paper has implications on the benefits and costs of allowing foreign retail stores entry into marketing in developing countries 

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